Wednesday, April 04, 2007

Kothimbir Vadi


Kothimbir Vadi is a starter snack that is extremely popular among maharashtrians. It is found in many eateries that pride themselves in Marathi cuisine and there are not many even in Mumbai. What a shame. Yet they do get thronged for their speciality. Most times when friends ask for a typically marathi dish I make this and it is always a hit with them. It is made with abundant use of Cilantro which is called Kothimbir in marathi.
Ingredients
1 big bunch Cilantro
2 cups chickpea flour
1/4 cup peanuts coarse crushed
4-5 fine chopped green chilies
1 teaspoon red chili powder
1/2 teaspoon turmeric powder
1 teaspoon coriander powder
1/4 teaspoon asofeotida
1 cup water
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
First the preparation. Grease the steamer trays and keep aside. While getting the trays ready pour 2 glasses water in a large vessel. I use a big 12 liter pressure cooker as a steamer. Leave the water to boil with lid on.
Mix all the ingredients in a large bowl with water to get a batter of pouring consistency. Pour the batter in the greased trays. The thickness should be about 1/4 inch. We have to leave space in the tray for it to rise a bit.
This stand is used for steaming all types of Vadis, Dhokla and Tatte idli.
If the water is now boiling and steam has collected put in the stand for steaming the batter for 20 mins with lid. If pressure cooker is used like I do then without the weight. After steaming the batter will set and rise a bit. The thickness of the steamed batter is a little more than the 1/4 inch we filled in the tray but not too puffed up.

Let it cool for 1/2 hr. and then cut up into large square pieces for the traditional feel or use cookie cutter to get the shape of your choice. Remove from the trays and save.
When you are ready to serve fry the cut outs in hot oil till golden to get nice crisp outside. Serve with dry garlic chutney or shengdane/ peanut chutney or for the kids ketchup.
Tip: When you expect a lot of guest this can be steamed and refrigerated and fried at the time of serving. So the guest get steaming hot Kothimbir Vadi.
All maharashtrians swear by it. I'm sure its OK for you to try a fried one once in a while. Khaoon tar paha you will hear a maharashtrian tell you when offering this vadi. Need I say more.
Updated: 15th Nov 08
I find many people come to this blog searching for Kothimbir Vadi and reach this page but they do see the second type so let me link it up.

21 comments:

bee said...

oh, man. we love this dish.

Nupur said...

The pictures are amazing, Anjali. Those lucky lucky guests who got to eat this for tea!
My favorite way of eating kothimbir wadi: as a side-dish with varan-bhaat-toop-limbu :) the way my aji would serve it. I also like it just steamed, with some tadka on top. Thanks for an amazing entry!

Anjali said...

Nupur The vadi with a phodni is a good option too but it got to be small bits so it gets the flavours of the seasonings.

HAREKRISHNAJI said...

delicious

Linda said...

Hi Anjali -- your recipe sounds delicious! I am amazed at the photos of the cake 'batter' in that steamer! Would you mind sharing where you got that great utensil? :)

Anjali said...

Hi Linda I bought this at a neighborhood shop here in Bangalore. It is called Tatte idli stand or Dhokla stand.

Devyani said...

Hello Anjaliji, i loved visiting your blog. Was looking for Dadpe Pohe's recipe. I am glad to check many more maharastian recipies on your blog. Years back when I was schooling, my Maharastian friend's mother used to prepare dadpe pohe for us to snack on. my friend's mom used to make yummy dadpe pohe. I still remember the taste. my friend's mother was a good cook and i always loved eating her preparations even if it was a simple poli bhaji. she had a special magic touch. I felt that same warmness in your blog & your collection of recipies. The coincidence is that my friend's mothers name is Anjali & so is yours. My hunger for dadpe pohe and emotion attached to it was satisfied by your blog.

Anjali said...

Devyani thank you! Thats the sweetest things said to me in a long time.

bhooma said...

wow.. first time I visited the blog and reading all the comments about the various Marathi dishes brought back tears to my eyes and had my mouth watering. cant forget those countless kothimbir vadis or the thalee peets or the bakar vadis or the other exotic dishes that my Maharastrian friends would get me when I was working in Mumbai!!! brought back extremely fond memories .. thanks dear

Anjali said...

Thanks Bhooma I am happy it did bring back memories to you.

kangna said...

hi can we use the rice cooker steaming plate to cook this??

Anjali said...

Hi Kangna, welcome here!Any plate kept above the water level in the steamer/ cooker will work just fine.

Sonia said...

Anjali, I made these ithey baghun, they have turned out wonderful! Thank you :)

Anjali said...

Wow! U did try!!! thanks for writing in abot it. Thrilled :D

Anonymous said...

show me to make gujarati recipe phulvadi

Anjali said...

At your command my Maharaja/ Maharani Anon! LOL !!! Haven't heard of it but I will share it once I learn and share it here. Keep my fee ready.

Piyusha said...

Hi Anjali, Yesterday I bought Kothimber vadi from a store in Mumbai and it was dam yummy. I thought of trying it but had no recipe. Your recipe looks to be the perfect one...I will try this. Thanks Piyusha

Anjali said...

Piyusha it is perfect snack for the rainy season, do try and let me know how it turned out. BTW your name is Piyusha and have you tasted a Maharashtrian drink Piyush?

Anonymous said...

hey looks great and very easily explained thanks will try soon

Thanks

Krishne Gowda N L said...

Mouth watering photos... will try this dish today.

maha said...

wow...........looks really awesome.u made it perfectly......

Popular Posts